Teaching

Metacognition - Part 1 - What is This Thing Called Metacognition?

Earlier this week, I came across a Learning Scientists' post about Metacognition on Twitter. Metacognition is one of the buzz words du jour and I felt excited to think about how I could tap into these ideas, how I could create some Process Projects and possibly use some Growth Journals with my students.

Then I took a step back and thought, WAIT! What is all this jargon? Sounds like a lot of nonsense!

Motivating Teens by Sending Them Online

Have Your Teens Always Got Something Better To Do?

Let’s face it, most teens can always find something to do instead of practise piano.

With pressures from school, sports and other activities alongside the always-on social networking aspect of their lives, encouraging teens to engage in a solitary activity that requires serious focus and effort can be a hard sell.

That’s where this post comes in: I’m going to discuss some ideas to get teens fully engaged in their piano practice by getting them to do something else entirely.

What Can Playing Volleyball Teach Us About Playing the Piano?

Volleyball and Piano. Not related, surely? Well... I think there are some interesting and important parallels between sport and music. Both require skill and practice to develop competence, both can be enjoyed by the player as well as by an audience or spectators. What I think is particularly useful is where differences start to emerge: In my experience (very much anecdotal and not scientific at all!) people are more ready to commit to drills and practice in volleyball than they are with piano; whilst anxiety about performing in front of others often seems to be less of an issue in volleyball than with piano. Starting from these observations, what can playing volleyball teach us about playing the piano?